Shocking ISIS manifesto details life of extreme oppression for women

Jihadi brides: Zahra and Salma Halane, 17, left their home in Chorlton, Manchester, and joined the Al Khansa Brigade in Syria in June last year after becoming radicalized online.

Jihadi brides: Zahra and Salma Halane, 17, left their home in Chorlton, Manchester, and joined the Al Khansa Brigade in Syria in June last year after becoming radicalized online.

Militants working for ISIS' all-female police force in Syria have released a manifesto on the role of women - claiming children as young as nine should be encouraged to get married and condemning beauty parlours as the work of the devil.

The chilling document, titled 'Women in the Islamic State', demands women live a completely 'sedentary' lifestyle and that their role in life should be primarily to remain 'hidden and veiled' and at the service of men, who are described as their masters.

The manifesto urges 'pure' females to ensure they are married by 16, 'while they are still young and active', but insists that children as young as nine can 'legitimately' marry adult men.

It goes on to state that beauty parlours and shops selling fashionable clothes must not be tolerated as they are both instruments of the devil designed to encourage women to spend vast amounts of money to change God's design.

The document is the first of its kind to be released by ISIS' all-female Al-Khansa Brigade and while it claims not to have been written or approved by ISIS' leadership, it provides a disturbing look at the way women living under the terror group's barbaric regime can expect to be viewed and treated.

The document was originally released by the Al-Khansa Brigade last month but as it was written in Arabic, it failed to make an impact on Western ISIS jihadis or supporters. To avoid the crucial information being lost to English-language terror experts, the counter-extremism think tank Quilliam has now fully translated the manifesto and released its own analysis of its contents.

In stark contradiction to the way life under the rule of ISIS is portrayed on social media, the document explains that the primary duty of Western women who join the terror group is to marry a jihadi, then spend their life cooking, cleaning and raising a family.

It suggests that young Western women who spend their time online boasting of leading an exciting and fulfilling lifestyle under the rule of ISIS are lying, possibly under pressure from the group's leadership who want to encourage a greater number of women to travel to Syria and marry fighters.

The document describes how women in the once relatively Westernised Syrian city of Raqqa are now 'liberated' by laws demanding they are fully covered in public, as it prevents their 'humiliation'. 

Despite talk of mass hunger, struggling hospitals, electricity blackouts and a near collapse of the local economy, the Al-Khansa Brigade writer insists that ISIS has eradicated poverty in the areas under its control and that hospitals are full of 'modern medical technology that could treat all those suffering from chronic diseases, including cancer'.

'Women benefit from a substantial amount of these services, for example the maternity hospital, which provides specialist care for mother and son who are examined by pediatricians who give them the cures they need, the document says.

The manifesto begins with a lengthy rejection of Western values, including financial systems and scientific research. The author attacks studying 'the brain cells of crows, grains of sand and fish arteries' as a distraction from the fundamental purpose of humanity, to worship God.

In one of many moments of hypocrisy in the document however, the Al-Khansa Brigade writer states that certain scientific research 'that help facilitate the lives of Muslims and their affairs are permissible', outlining such necessities as including medicine, agriculture and architecture. 

The bulk of the manifesto focuses on the role of women, slamming feminism as contrary to God's plan and insisting that the roles of men and women have become confused as women no longer fully submit to their master husband.

This, the author claims, is largely the fault of men, who have allowed their 'God-given right' for dominance over women to dwindle, 'forcing women away from their true role' and leaving them 'confused and complacent' within the home.

'Because men are serving women like themselves, men cannot distinguish themselves from them... if men were men then women would be women,' the author states.

The implication is those fighting for ISIS are 'real men', whereas men living in the West have become weak and submissive. This is something the Al-Khansa Brigade believes angers a God who made women 'from Adam and for Adam'. 

Describing everyday life in ISIS' de facto capital Raqqa, the manifesto says that the city has become the primary destination for all foreigners looking to join the Islamic State. 

'It is a haven for them to flee with their religion from the oppression of tyrants in the east and west and place in which they are privileged with elegant homes that harbour friends of God,' it says.

'The way of life for women in Raqqa does not differ from that in Mosul. Security, justice, fairness, healthy living, education and healthcare are all of equal importance in the Caliphate,' it adds.

The document paints life in the city as extremely multicultural, with the author listing her immediate neighbours as an Arab, a Chechen and a Kazach.

'There is no difference between Arabs and Persians, blacks or whites. All are under the rule of Islam. It is not possible to live in this Islamic way in any place ruled by tyrants, who implement nationalism over religion and patriotism over Shariah,' the document states.

'Tribes are merged and races join under the banner of monotheism, resulting in new generations within which are gathered the cultures of many different peoples, one a beautiful meeting, and harmonious alliance,' it adds.

Little is known about ISIS' Al-Khansa Brigade, although they are thought to act as a kind of all-female police force inside Raqqa and in the Iraqi city of Mosul.

Dozens of young British women have used social media to boast of joining the force – claiming to be doling out savage beatings, punishment lashings, ordering executions and managing brothels where thousands of Yazidi sex slaves are imprisoned and raped daily after being sold for as little as £27.

Britons including privately-educated Glaswegian Aqsa Mahmood, 20, and Lewisham-born Khadijah Dare, 22, are understood to have joined the Al-Khansa Brigade in Raqqa, helping to patrol the city with guns and daggers hidden beneath their religious robes.

Other Britions believed to have been joined the Al Khansa Brigade include the Manchester-born 'terror twins' Zahra and Salma Halane, who have 28 GCSE's between them.

The group, which is largely made-up of educated Western women, operates as an ultra-oppressive police force monitoring the behaviour of females in the city - meting out brutal punishments to anyone wearing shoes that aren't black, or those wearing veils made from the wrong material.

Thanks to the head-to-toe niqabs all women living in ISIS-held territory are forced to wear, the Al-Khansa Brigade also acts as a Stasi-esque secret police force - with members covertly spying on men suspected of wrongdoing, before reporting them to ISIS' feared Hisbah religious authority.

Although the figures are impossible to independently verify, the Terrorism Research and Analysis Consortium (TRAC) believes as many as 60 British nationals are currently members of Al-Khansa.


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