ISIS puts out instruction guide for 'lone wolf' terrorists

From MailOnline

By Julian Robinson

ISIS has issued a chilling guide describing how to carry out 'lone wolf' terror attacks - after updating a version originally produced by al-Qaeda.

The manual, translated into English, is headed 'safety and security guidelines for Lone Wolf Mujahideen and small cells' and features mocked-up images of New York buildings on fire on the front page.

The 64-page guide was first published by al-Qaeda but has been updated by ISIS extremists to include advice on how would-be attackers can avoid being detected.

The manual features mocked-up images of New York buildings on fire.

The manual features mocked-up images of New York buildings on fire.

The manual, translated into English, is headed 'safety and security guidelines for Lone Wolf Mujahideen and small cells' and features mocked-up images of New York buildings on fire.

According to the Sun, it explains which encrypted mobile phone apps to use and the ones to avoid.

The 12-chapter manual is also said to reveal how to go online without being detected and how to tell if a spy is trying to infiltrate a small cell.

It is not the first time an ISIS terror guide has emerged.

 

In June it was revealed how manuals outlining how to make bombs and use firearms effectively were being circulated by British extremists online.

The interactive guides, which also encouraged lone wolf attacks, were compiled by a militant from England who claims to have links to ISIS.

They included step-by-step instructions on how to make car bombs 'Iraqi style' and a piece on staying anonymous while using a smartphone. 

One, titled the Book of Terror, contains a video of the murder of Fusilier Lee Rigby, who was killed while off-duty near the Royal Artillery Barracks in Woolwich in 2013.

It also features a clip of the 7/7 London terror attacks, which left 52 dead and more than 700 people injured. 

In December, senior police figures warned Britain must be braced for lone-wolf terrorist atrocities.

Lord Blair, who led Scotland Yard during the July 2005 London bombings, said police face a ‘difficult situation’ amid a growing threat.  

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