Broadway actor takes flak for planning to ‘disobey’ church lockdowns in Washington

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As medical-masked tyranny creeps across the United States, enlisting many citizens in its push to cancel Thanksgiving, church services, meals out and even interpersonal relationships, the brave are speaking out.

A Broadway actor who got over COVID-19 is taking heat for a Nov. 15 Twitter post in which he expressed his intention to “respectfully disobey” Washington state’s restrictions on worship services and, yes, indoor singing.

According to The Daily Wire, Chad Kimball, a Seattle native nominated in 2011 for a Tony for his performance in Memphis, also targeted Democratic Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, suggesting that his orders for a new coronavirus lockdown are an example of “gathering ‘benevolent’ TYRANNY.”

Posting on his account a picture of the lockdown order that limits church services in Washington state at 25 percent capacity or 200 people, Kimball highlighted the part of the regulation that bans group singing and wrote, “Respectfully, I will never allow a Governor, or anyone, to stop me from SINGING, let alone sing in worship to my God. Folks, absolute POWER corrupts ABSOLUTELY. This is not about safety. It’s about POWER. I will respectfully disobey these unlawful orders.”

“To be clear: nobody is going maskless,” Kimball added. “The overreach – in my opinion! – is not being able to sing even WITH a mask. No singing WITH a mask ON. Everyone will continue wearing masks. With respect and with hope and with care.”

Kimball’s comments brought scolding from some of his Broadway colleagues, such as Sharon Wheatley, who costarred with him in “Come From Away.” She wrote, “I respectfully totally and completely disagree with you. I respectfully feel you are very much on the wrong side of this. I FaceTimed with you when you had Covid, Chad. You were very sick. I remember. It scared me. I love you like a brother, but I disagree with you.”

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